Caring for a Loved One with Advanced Cancer: Determinants of Psychological Distress in Family Caregivers

Caring for a Loved One with Advanced Cancer: Determinants of Psychological Distress in Family Caregivers

Caring for a Loved One with Advanced Cancer: Determinants of Psychological Distress in Family Caregivers

Caring for a Loved One with Advanced Cancer: Determinants of Psychological Distress in Family Caregiverss

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Référence bibliographique [3170]

Journal of Palliative Medicine, vol. 9, no 4, p. 912-921.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Family caregivers caring for a patient with terminal cancer may experience significant psychological distress. […] The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the family caregivers’ psychological distress is
influenced by the patients’ performance status while taking into account individual characteristics of caregivers and their unmet needs. » (p. 912)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Two hundred twelve family caregivers […] » (p. 912)

Instruments :
- Questionnaire sociodémographique
- Indice de détresse psychologique de Santé Québec (IDPESQ).

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Family caregivers’ psychosocial distress is strongly associated with the patients’ terminal disease progress and declined functioning. The level of psychological distress varies from 25.2 to 33.5 (p = 0.0008) between the groups. Moreover, the percentage of caregivers with a high level of psychological distress varies from 41% to 62%, while this percentage is estimated at 19.2% in general population. A high distress index was significantly associated with the caregiver’s burden, the patient’s young age, the patient’s symptoms, the caregiver’s young age and gender, a poor perception of his/her health and dissatisfaction with emotional and tangible support. […] Family caregivers of patients in the advanced stages of cancer experience a high level of psychological distress, which increases significantly as the patient loses autonomy. Health care policies and programs need to be revisited in order to take the reality of these patients and their families into account. » (p. 912)