Associations between a Functional Independence Measure (WeeFIM) and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL4.0) in Young Children
with Physical Disabilities

Associations between a Functional Independence Measure (WeeFIM) and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL4.0) in Young Children
with Physical Disabilities

Associations between a Functional Independence Measure (WeeFIM) and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL4.0) in Young Children
with Physical Disabilities

Associations between a Functional Independence Measure (WeeFIM) and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL4.0) in Young Children
with Physical Disabilitiess

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Référence bibliographique [3110]

with Physical Disabilities ». Quality of Life Research, vol. 15, no 6, p. 1023-1031.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« [The aim of this study was] To determine the association between functional status, measured by the WeeFIM [functional independence measure] and health related quality of life (HRQL), measured by the PedsQL4.0 [pediatric quality of life inventory] for children with physical disabilities. To explore child, parent and service-related factors associated with each of these measures. » (p. 1023)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Parents of 115 children (2–5 years) with physical disabilities who were referred to occupational (OT) or physical therapy (PT). Mean age of the children was 3 years 7 months (±10 months), 79 were boys and 67 were diagnosed with global developmental delay. » (p. 1023)

Instruments :
- Questionnaire de recherche
- WeeFIM
- PedsQL4.0

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The WeeFIM selfcare and mobility subscales, as well as the PedsQL-Physical Health Summary scores appear to measure somewhat similar physical dimensions of health and functioning. Our results indicate that these scores for children with physical disabilities are fair to moderately correlated. The WeeFIM subscales and the Peds-QL-Psychosocial Health score however measure different aspects of a child’s health and well-being. It should be emphasized that parents of children with lower functional skills can nevertheless perceive a good quality of life for their children. The results of the study support the need to incorporate complementary measures that are not only focused on function but also include general health and life quality when measuring the overall status of children with disabilities. This would provide professionals with a better indicator of physical, social and emotional well-being and how well a child is performing and integrating in his environment. This would shift the focus of rehabilitation goals to promoting and enhancing health and wellbeing, rather than the traditional emphasis on preventing and minimizing long term disabilities and impairments, which would be in accordance with the recent expansion of the health concept by the WHO [World Health Organization]. » (pp. 1029-1030)