Breastfeeding and the Cultural Configuration of Social Space among Vietnamese Immigrant Woman

Breastfeeding and the Cultural Configuration of Social Space among Vietnamese Immigrant Woman

Breastfeeding and the Cultural Configuration of Social Space among Vietnamese Immigrant Woman

Breastfeeding and the Cultural Configuration of Social Space among Vietnamese Immigrant Womans

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Référence bibliographique [3109]

Groleau, Danielle, Soulière, Margot et Kirmayer, Laurence J. 2006. «Breastfeeding and the Cultural Configuration of Social Space among Vietnamese Immigrant Woman ». Health & Place, vol. 12, no 4, p. 516-526.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this paper, we examine possible influences on breastfeeding practices amongst Vietnamese immigrants to Québec. » (p. 517)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The sample consisted of 20 immigrant Vietnamese mothers living in a mid-size city, in the province of Québec, Canada. » (p. 517)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« The findings of the present study suggest [...] that breastfeeding is a behavior strongly ritualized and influenced by culture even in the context of a new sociogeographical space. All mothers found it difficult or impossible to breastfeed not because of change in beliefs but, as a result of their new social space of residence, where contrary to the refugee camp, crucial elements of the social system that sustains this practice were not in place. [...] The present study illustrates that rite of passage to motherhood includes bodily and nutritional rites that are also necessary to breastfeeding. It is mothers’ social space per se, i.e. access to significant members of their family or community, such as in refugee camp, that played a central role in facilitating the implementation of these rituals. [...] Our results indicate that the absence of key family members in their new social space played an even more important role for first-time mothers, by preventing them from following the bodily and nutritional rituals necessary for the production of quality maternal milk. » (p. 523)