The Health of Single Fathers: Demographic, Economic and Social Correlates

The Health of Single Fathers: Demographic, Economic and Social Correlates

The Health of Single Fathers: Demographic, Economic and Social Correlates

The Health of Single Fathers: Demographic, Economic and Social Correlatess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [3080]

Janzen, Bonnie L., Green, Kathryn et Muhajarine, Nazeem. 2006. «The Health of Single Fathers: Demographic, Economic and Social Correlates ». Revue canadienne de santé publique / Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 97, no 6, p. 440-444.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The proportion of families headed by single fathers is increasing in many developed countries. The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of single parenting on the self-rated health of Canadian fathers living with children, and the extent to which this relationship can be explained by social, demographic, and economic factors. » (p. 440)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The sample studied consists of 15,662 Canadian men aged 15-64, living with at least one child under the age of 25. » (p. 440)

Instruments :
« The dependant variable in this study was self-rated health. Participants were asked to rate their general health on a 5-point scale ranging from ’excellent’ to ’poor’. […]
The primary independent variable studied was partner status. […]
The measure of social support in the CCHS are based on the Medical Outcomes Social Support Survey (MOS) and consists of four dimensions […] » (p. 441)

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Compared to partnered fathers, single fathers had poorer self-rated health. The relationship between partner status and self-rated health could be completely explained by single fathers’ old age, lower income, and higher rate of unemployment. […] Single fathers experience poorer perceived health. This effect appears to result from the economic and social disadvantage associated with raising children alone rather than from single parenting in and of itself. These findings, in combination with previous research, suggest a need for provincial and federal policies to target the well-being of both single mothers and fathers. » (p. 440)