Dysfunctional Attitudes, Self-Esteem, and Hassles: Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parents

Dysfunctional Attitudes, Self-Esteem, and Hassles: Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parents

Dysfunctional Attitudes, Self-Esteem, and Hassles: Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parents

Dysfunctional Attitudes, Self-Esteem, and Hassles: Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parentss

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Référence bibliographique [2798]

Behaviour Research and Therapy, vol. 45, no 6, p. 1127-1140.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of the current study is to provide a stringent test of the diathesis-stress component of Beck’s (1967, 1983) cognitive theory of depression in a sample of children and early adolescents. In addition, we examined whether high self-esteem buffers cognitively vulnerable youth against experiencing increases in depressive symptoms following increases in their level of hassles.» (pp. 1129-1130)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«In line with the diathesis-stress component of Beck’s (1967, 1983) cognitive theory of depression, we hypothesized that higher levels of dysfunctional attitudes would be associated with greater fluctuations in depressive symptoms following fluctuations in hassles. At the same time, in line with our integrative hypothesis, we hypothesized that high levels of self-esteem would buffer children possessing high levels of dysfunctional attitudes against experiencing greater fluctuations in depressive symptoms following fluctuations in hassles. More specifically, we hypothesized that children exhibiting high levels of dysfunctional attitudes and low levels of self-esteem would report greater elevations in depressive symptoms following elevations in hassles than children possessing either one or neither of these vulnerability factors.» (p. 1130)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«[W]e utilized a sample of children of parents whose parents had a history of major depressive episodes. » (p. 1130)
« The final sample was drawn from 102 families and consisted of 140 children (69 boys and 71 girls) and one of their parents (88 mothers and 14 fathers). [...] Children’s ages ranged from six to fourteen with a median age of 10. Parents’ ages ranged from 27 to 53 with a median age of 41.» (p. 1130)

Instruments :
Instrument utilisé auprès des parents :
- Questionnaire socio-démographique
Instruments utilisés auprès des enfants :
-«[T]he Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (First, Gibbon, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001)» (p. 1130)
-«[T]he Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1992)» (p. 1131)
-«[T]he Children’s Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (Abela & Sullivan, 2003)» (p. 1131)
-«[T]he Self-Esteem Questionnaire (Rosenberg, 1965)» (p. 1131)
-«[T]he CDI and Children’s Hassles Scale (HASC; Kanner, Feldman, Weinberger & Ford, 1987)» (p. 1131)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results of the current study provide support for the applicability of the diathesis-stress component of the integration of Beck’s (1967, 1983) cognitive theory of depression with self-esteem theory to children and early adolescents. In line with hypotheses, children who possessed both high levels of dysfunctional attitudes and low levels of self-esteem reported greater elevations in depressive symptoms following fluctuations in hassles than children who possessed only one of these vulnerability factors. More specifically, children possessing both cognitive vulnerability factors, reported higher levels of depressive symptoms when they were experiencing high as opposed to low levels of hassles. At the same time and contrary to hypotheses, children who possessed low levels of dysfunctional attitudes and high levels of self-esteem also reported fluctuations in depressive symptoms when experiencing high levels of hassles.» (p. 1136)