A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Genetic and Environmental Etiology of Maternal Hostile-Reactive Behavior During Infancy and Toddlerhood

A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Genetic and Environmental Etiology of Maternal Hostile-Reactive Behavior During Infancy and Toddlerhood

A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Genetic and Environmental Etiology of Maternal Hostile-Reactive Behavior During Infancy and Toddlerhood

A Longitudinal Twin Study of the Genetic and Environmental Etiology of Maternal Hostile-Reactive Behavior During Infancy and Toddlerhoods

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Référence bibliographique [2585]

Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 30, no 3, p. 453-465.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The main objective of this study was to document the genetic and environmental etiology of mothers’ hostile-reactive parenting behaviors across infancy and toddlerhood. » (p. 455)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« [W]e hypothesized that the heritability of maternal hostility would increase between infancy and toddlerhood, and that heritable factors in the child, as well as common environment factors, would contribute to the stability of maternal behavior between 5 and 30 months. » (p. 455)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The Quebec Newborn Twin Study (QNTS) is based on a representative sample of twins born between April 1995 and December 1998 in the Greater Montreal Area. A total of 989 families of twins were asked to join the QNTS; of these, 662 agreed to participate and were assessed at 5 months. » (p. 455)

Instruments :
- The « Parental Cognitions and Conduct Toward the Infant Scale (Pacotis, Boivin et al., 2005) »;
- the « Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (Bates, Freeman, & Lounsbury, 1979) »;
- the « structural equation modeling (Neale & Cardon, 1992) ». (pp. 456-457)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Maternal negative emotions have been shown to predict later antisocial behaviors in children above the influence of genes (Caspi et al., 2004; Jaffee, Caspi, Moffit, & Taylor, 2004). The actual consensus is that parenting behaviors are influenced by multiple determinants, including the parent’s own psychological resources, the family context, and the child’s characteristics (Belsky, 1984). However, there is disagreement about the magnitude of these last ’child effects’ (Collins, Maccoby, Steinberg, Hetherington, & Bornstein, 2000; Dodge, 1990). [...] Thus, we know little of the contribution of heritable characteristics of young children to the stability of the early parent-child relation. [...] Therefore, [in this study] the genetic-environmental analysis of maternal hostile reactive behavior was examined within the context of the mothers’ perception of their twins’ differences in difficult temperament and disruptive behavior, which are likely to evoke parental negativity. [...] Three main features of the results stand out with respect to this initial goal. First, there was a substantial increase in mean levels of hostile-reactive maternal behavior between 5 and 30 months. This systematic increase suggests a developmental-maturational driven child effect on maternal behavior. Second, there was also evidence of more specific genetically driven child effects resulting in differential maternal hostile reactive behaviors within family. However, these genetic child effects on maternal hostile-reactive behaviors were not found at all ages. Finally, we did not find evidence that genetic factors accounted for the stability of maternal hostile reactive behaviors, as they were rather accounted by shared environment. Each of these points is discussed in greater details below. » (pp. 453; 455; 460)