Social Problem-Solving in High-Risk Mother-Child Dyads: An Intergenerational Study

Social Problem-Solving in High-Risk Mother-Child Dyads: An Intergenerational Study

Social Problem-Solving in High-Risk Mother-Child Dyads: An Intergenerational Study

Social Problem-Solving in High-Risk Mother-Child Dyads: An Intergenerational Studys

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« […] the present study was designed to examine the contribution of maternal childhood histories of aggression and social withdrawal to the prediction of mother-child problem-solving strategies across three important stages: problem definition, solution generation and decision-making. » (p.9)

Questions/Hypothèses:
« Hypothesis 1. Regarding the problem-definition stage, maternal childhood histories of aggression and/or social withdrawal were expected to negatively impact dyads’ ability to discuss their conflict in depth, as reflected by fewer defining statements overall. Hypothesis 2. Regarding the solution generation stage, dyads with maternal childhood histories of aggression and/or withdrawal were expected to generate fewer and less sophisticated solutions overall. […] Hypothesis 3. Regarding the decision-making stage, it was predicted that dyads with mothers high on aggression and/or withdrawal would resolve their conflicts less; however, it was also expected that, when resolved, these dyads would be ineffective in their decision-making. » (p. 9-10)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Between 1976 and 1978, 1774 students in grades 1, 4 and 7 attending French speaking public schools were recruited from inner-city, low socio-economic neighborhoods of Montreal […]. These students were screened on dimensions of aggression and social withdrawal by means of a French version of the Pupil Evaluation Inventory (PEI; Pekarik, Prinz, Liebert, Weintraub, & Neale 1976). […] The present study comprised 57 mothers and their 9-13-year-old children, drawn from a larger study of 73 participants from the Concordia study when their children were preschoolers. These families were visited at home and mother-child interactions were observed in several contexts. [...] A total of 24 boys and 33 girls participated with their mothers. At the time of data collection, children’s ages ranged between 9.49 to 13.29 years [...]. » (p. 10-11)

Instruments:
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« A key component of socio-emotional and cognitive development is the capacity to effectively resolve day-to-day social problems. Parents play a vital role in fostering children’s problem-solving skills. The present study examined the contribution of maternal childhood histories of aggression and social withdrawal to the prediction of mother-child problem definition, solution generation and decision-making strategies. […] Results supported the hypotheses that maternal childhood histories of aggression and withdrawal contribute to the prediction of poorly sophisticated solutions generated by mothers and children, as well as antisocial solutions generated by children. Results also demonstrated that maternal childhood histories of withdrawal contribute to the prediction of solitary solutions generated by children as well as less guidance and structure during the decision-making stage. Taken together, the results lend support to the continuity of risk whereby mothers who were socially withdrawn, and those who were both aggressive and withdrawn in childhood, display less sophisticated problem-solving strategies which appear to be mirrored in their children. The results broaden current understanding of mother-child problem-solving abilities in a high-risk, intergenerational sample of children in middle childhood, and highlight a potential pathway to the direct transmission of risk. » (p. iii-iv)