Baby-Boomers and the ’Denaturalisation’ of Care-Giving in Quebec

Baby-Boomers and the ’Denaturalisation’ of Care-Giving in Quebec

Baby-Boomers and the ’Denaturalisation’ of Care-Giving in Quebec

Baby-Boomers and the ’Denaturalisation’ of Care-Giving in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [214]

Guberman, Nancy, Lavoie, Jean-Pierre et Olazabal, Ignace. 2011. «Baby-Boomers and the ’Denaturalisation’ of Care-Giving in Quebec ». Ageing & Society, vol. 31, p. 1141-1158.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article reports on aspects of this study that examined baby-boomer care-givers’ identification with their social generation, their relationship to care-giving and their values regarding care-giving, and the reality of the care-giving they offer and proposes an understanding of our respondents’ expectations and experience of care-giving as illustrations of the ‘denaturalisation’ of care-giving.» (p. 1144)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The North American post-war generation, known as the baby-boomers, has challenged traditional family relations and the sexual division of labour. How do these challenges play out in the face of frail, ill or disabled family members?» (p. 1141)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We met with 40 care-givers [in Montreal] for a one and a halfhour qualitative interview to discuss their identification with their social generation, their relationship to care-giving, their values regarding care-giving, and the reality of the care-giving they offer.» (p. 1141)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The findings indicate that women, in particular, no longer identify themselves mainly in terms of family. For most, care-giving is not their only or even their dominant identity. They are actively trying to maintain multiple identities: worker, wife, mother, friend and social activist, alongside that of care-giver. They are also participating in the very North American process of individualisation, leading to what we call the ’denaturalisation’ of care-giving. Notably, the women we met with call themselves ’care-givers’ and not simply wives, daughters or mothers, denoting that the work of care-giving no longer falls within the realm of ’normal’ family responsibilities. These care-givers thus set limits to their caring commitments and have high expectations as to services and public support, while still adhering to norms of family responsibility for care-giving.» (p. 1141)