Quality of Life in Immigrant Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comparison with Parents from the Host Culture

Quality of Life in Immigrant Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comparison with Parents from the Host Culture

Quality of Life in Immigrant Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comparison with Parents from the Host Culture

Quality of Life in Immigrant Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Comparison with Parents from the Host Cultures

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Référence bibliographique [20808]

Journal of Child & Family Studies, vol. 28, p. 1512-1523.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The primary goal of [this] study was to document the FQOL [family quality of life] of immigrant parents of children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and to compare it to that of Canadian parents with a comparable socioeconomic status, while examining potential gender related differences. A secondary objective of the study was to examine the sources and perceived levels of external support by immigrant and Canadian parents.» (p. 1514)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data examined in the present study were collected as part of a larger investigation of the effectiveness of early intervention services provided in the suburbs of Montréal. In order to be eligible to participate in this larger study, families had to have a child who had been officially diagnosed with ASD and be on a waiting list for services at a regional rehabilitation center. [In total,] 58 families were included in the sample for the present study [50% are immigrant families].» (p. 1515)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results show in particular that «Canadian families reported significantly higher satisfaction with Family Interaction compared to immigrant families. The same pattern of differences was observed for the Disability-related Support subscale. Canadian parents also reported higher satisfaction with Emotional Well-being and Physical/Material Well-being […]. Conversely, immigrant parents had slightly, but not significantly, higher satisfaction ratings for Parenting compared to Canadian parents. No gender differences were noted on any of the subscales. Additionally, gender and immigration status did not interact for any of the subscales.» (p. 1517) Furthermore, «[a]lmost half of immigrant families reporting not having access to external support, whereas this proportion was much lower among Canadian respondents. However, fewer Canadian than immigrant families reported having a lot of external support. […] Among the immigrant families who reported having access to external support, a third indicated that this support network consisted of relatives (i.e., the child’s grandparents and the extended family). Among Canadian families, almost half received support from relatives.» (p. 1518)