The Interactive Effects of Parental Knowledge with Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking in Adolescent Substance Use

The Interactive Effects of Parental Knowledge with Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking in Adolescent Substance Use

The Interactive Effects of Parental Knowledge with Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking in Adolescent Substance Use

The Interactive Effects of Parental Knowledge with Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking in Adolescent Substance Uses

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Référence bibliographique [20794]

Child Psychiatry and Human Development, vol. 50, no 1, p. 95-107.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he present study [examines] the interactions of parental knowledge with impulsivity and sensation seeking at 15 years in the prediction of substance use outcomes (binge drinking and drug use) at 15 and 17 years.» (p. 97)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants come from a longitudinal study on the social, psychological and cognitive development of children in Québec, Canada.» (p. 97) «[T]he sample for this study consists of 230 participants (53% girls) with data between 15 […] and 17 years […].» (p. 98)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The main findings of this study first indicate that parental knowledge and impulsivity in adolescence interact in a diathesis–stress fashion to predict substance use, with adolescents high on impulsivity binge drinking and consuming drugs more frequently than their peers when parental knowledge is low. Second, this study found that parental knowledge and adolescent sensation seeking interacted in a differential susceptibility fashion to predict substance use, but that the more susceptible adolescents to parental knowledge were low in sensation seeking: parental knowledge was negatively associated with substance use when sensation seeking was low, but not when it was high.» (p. 102) «Results also have implications regarding the link between parental knowledge and substance use. Indeed, the association between parental knowledge and substance use was found to decrease over time. In the present study, interactions with parental knowledge were found for both binge drinking and drug use at 15 years, but only for drug use at 17 years. This suggests that parental knowledge may be particularly important in reducing problematic behaviors in adolescents, but only when those behaviors are not normative developmentally. Indeed, by 17 years, the majority of adolescents have had episodes of binge drinking, which may explain the decreased importance of parental knowledge for this behavior.» (p. 103)