Exploring Parent Sexuality Profiles and Links with the Sexuality Profiles of Adolescents who Have Engaged in Sexual Abuse

Exploring Parent Sexuality Profiles and Links with the Sexuality Profiles of Adolescents who Have Engaged in Sexual Abuse

Exploring Parent Sexuality Profiles and Links with the Sexuality Profiles of Adolescents who Have Engaged in Sexual Abuse

Exploring Parent Sexuality Profiles and Links with the Sexuality Profiles of Adolescents who Have Engaged in Sexual Abuses

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Référence bibliographique [20792]

Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 93, p. 66-78.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he objectives of this study are to […] examine particular dimensions of parents’ sexuality in order to identify sexual profiles in mothers and fathers, and […] examine if the sexual profiles of mothers and fathers (assessed individually or combined) could be related to the sexual profiles of AESA [adolescents who have engaged in sexual abuse].» (p. 69)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A total of 201 parents of AESA […] took part in the current study; 116 mothers (113 biological) and 85 fathers (80 biological). Their sons (N = 136) had committed at least one sexual offense involving physical contact as adolescents (12–17 years old). Participants were recruited from six specialized treatment centers and five youth centers for a larger study conducted in Quebec investigating family dynamics and relationships between AESA and their parents.» (p. 69)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our results suggest that the sexualized family environment previously identified among AESA families is related to parents’ own sexuality, and have many implications for AESA sexual development. Namely, parents’ personal experience of sexual development influences the adult (and parent) they become, which plays an important role on the family sexual environment they will foster (e.g., promiscuity between family members, lack of personal space, sex education, etc.). Examining the specific effects of parents’ sexuality, and their role as models in the sexual manifestations of their children, rather than focusing on the more general concept of a sexualized family environment, could improve the efficacy of prevention programs and treatment targets. For example, a general target could be to increase parents’ awareness of the influence of their actions and attitudes on their child’s sexual development. This would allow parents to better identify the personal changes they may adopt in order to serve as more appropriate role models. By extension, positive parental changes are likely to positively influence the family environment. Targeting personal changes (e.g., avoid exposing children to sexually explicit content) may seem more realistic and achievable for parents than trying to change the entire family environment.» (p. 77)