Child and Family Needs Profiles Among Cases Substantiated by Child Protection Services

Child and Family Needs Profiles Among Cases Substantiated by Child Protection Services

Child and Family Needs Profiles Among Cases Substantiated by Child Protection Services

Child and Family Needs Profiles Among Cases Substantiated by Child Protection Servicess

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Référence bibliographique [20789]

Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 81, p. 366-379.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]his study aimed at a better understanding of the needs of children whose case has been substantiated by child protection services by identifying different family profiles.» (p. 374)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This study is based on the data collected during the 2014 cycle of the Quebec Incidence Study (QIS-2014) […], which aims to document cases reported to governmental instances for maltreatment or severe behavioral problems. [T]he QIS-2014 includes 50% of all the children that were reported to the child protection services in Québec, and for which the report led to an investigation. […] The final sample includes 4011 children meeting the [present study’s] criteria (52.6% boys, 8 years and 5 months old on average).» (p. 368)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Profiles determined in the present study help better understand the differential needs of at-risk children and families. For instance, children and families in the first profile, called parental unavailability, would benefit from a family intervention directed at parental capacities and family climate. Further, parental practices training and alternatives to corporal punishment would be beneficiary for children and parents in the dysnormative profile. Systemic intervention targeting the child’s family and environment could help better meet the child’s needs in families from the child neglect profile, and child-specific interventions, aiming towards their specific difficulties, would be helpful for children and families in the child-specific difficulties profile. Finally, a more intensive systemic intervention would be helpful for children and families in the dysfunctional profile, as vulnerability is widespread and different forms of maltreatment co-occur. In a context where preventive and curative services tend to be integrated into a single service offer, this study supports the need of multisystemic interventions in order to cover various forms of risk. Instead of intervening only on the occurring problems, the integration of preventive approaches could help improve the families’ situation overall.» (p. 377)