Chronic Harsh Parenting and Anxiety Associations with Fear Circuitry Function in Healthy Adolescents: A Preliminary Study

Chronic Harsh Parenting and Anxiety Associations with Fear Circuitry Function in Healthy Adolescents: A Preliminary Study

Chronic Harsh Parenting and Anxiety Associations with Fear Circuitry Function in Healthy Adolescents: A Preliminary Study

Chronic Harsh Parenting and Anxiety Associations with Fear Circuitry Function in Healthy Adolescents: A Preliminary Studys

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Référence bibliographique [20786]

La Buissonnière-Ariza, Valérie, Séguin, Jean R., Nassim, Marouane, Boivin, Michel, Pine, Daniel S., Lepore, Franco, Tremblay, Richard E. et Maheu, Françoise S. 2019. «Chronic Harsh Parenting and Anxiety Associations with Fear Circuitry Function in Healthy Adolescents: A Preliminary Study ». Biological Psychology, vol. 145, p. 198-210.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In this study, [the authors] investigated fear circuitry function in youths with a history of high and low maternal harsh parenting displaying high or low levels of chronic, non-clinical anxiety, so as to shed light on the neural mechanisms that link and/or distinguish early adversity and trait anxiety in healthy adolescents.» (p. 198-199)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 84 jeunes âgés de 13 à 16 ans. Ils proviennent de deux études longitudinales, soit de l’Étude longitudinale du développement des enfants du Québec (ELDEQ) et du projet En 2001… J’avais 5 ans.

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Taken together, although preliminary, the present findings suggest specific associations of harsh parenting and trait anxiety with fear circuitry function […].» (p. 207) The authors showed that «a harsh parenting history may predispose youths for psychopathology not only because of a hypersensitivity to threat but also due to a less targeted suppression of fear responses and/or a less efficient modulation of attention to threat. […] No further differences were observed between high and low anxiety groups, independently of harsh parenting levels, in terms of discrimination conditioning, both at the neural and at the behavioral/ physiological levels. However, increased fear ratings to CS- were found in high relative to low anxiety, despite equivalent levels of discrimination conditioning. […] This, however, seems to be present only in a context of low adversity. Indeed, anxiety differences seemed to be driven by the low harsh parenting groups, suggesting that harsh parenting may have a modulatory influence on anxiety. [The authors] suggest that a history of harsh parenting may lead to a unique anxious phenotype, which is separate from anxious manifestations of other sources.» (p. 207)