Siblings’ Graphic Représentations the of a Family Member with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Study

Siblings’ Graphic Représentations the of a Family Member with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Study

Siblings’ Graphic Représentations the of a Family Member with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Study

Siblings’ Graphic Représentations the of a Family Member with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Studys

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Référence bibliographique [20757]

Goupil, Georgette, Poirier, Nathalie et Morand, Julien. 2017. Siblings’ Graphic Représentations the of a Family Member with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Study. Actes du colloque de l’«International Psychological Applications Confence and Trends» tenu du 29 avril au 1er mai 2017 à Budapest (Hongrie):

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study aims to use drawing in order to get an understanding of how siblings of children with ASD [Autism Spectrum Disorder] perceive their relationship with their brother or sister.» (p. 337)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Eight girls aged from 6 to 12 […] with a sibling with ASD participated in this study. The siblings with ASD were four boys and four girls aged between 5 and 12 […].» (p. 337) «A questionnaire was used to collect information about the family and their siblings [and we] asked children to draw three different situations [about their family]. Following the three drawings, we questioned the children in order to obtain information about the characters and situations represented in the drawings.» (p. 337)

Instruments :
- Questionnaire
- Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«According to preliminary results, all of the siblings’ graphic representations portrayed the whole family. The child with ASD was always present. The activities portrayed were diversified: walking in a park, swimming, eating ice cream, having a meal and dancing. When asked to picture themselves playing with their brother or sister with ASD. Siblings identified different activities: playing with “Legos or Shopkins”, biking, swimming, running and dancing. One child drew herself running in a hallway to allow his brother with ASD to relieve his “excess energy”. For some children, these activities were done regularly. One sister reported dancing daily with her sister before supper. When asked to imagine their sibling with ASD on the playground. Two drawings presented the child with ASD alone. In three drawings, interactions with peers were less evident than in the second drawing, as the child with ASD is represented practicing a solitary activity. However, three children were clearly represented as having interactions with peers: playing soccer, Battleship and tag game. When talking about their interactions with their brother or sister, the majority of the siblings clearly stated differences or particularities relating to ASD. […] These preliminary results indicate that the participants perceived their siblings with ASD as full members of the family.» (p. 338)