Emotion Regulation in At-Risk Mother-Child Dyads During Middle Childhood: Associations with Concurrent Functioning and Adolescent Outcomes

Emotion Regulation in At-Risk Mother-Child Dyads During Middle Childhood: Associations with Concurrent Functioning and Adolescent Outcomes

Emotion Regulation in At-Risk Mother-Child Dyads During Middle Childhood: Associations with Concurrent Functioning and Adolescent Outcomes

Emotion Regulation in At-Risk Mother-Child Dyads During Middle Childhood: Associations with Concurrent Functioning and Adolescent Outcomess

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The two studies that make up the present dissertation were designed to investigate the emotion regulation abilities of school-aged children and their mothers in two different samples of families at-risk for negative psychosocial outcomes. Specifically, it examined the associations between mother and child emotion regulation abilities in middle childhood, and mothers’ childhood histories of aggression, parenting factors, child behaviour, and the longitudinal association of these early behaviours to adolescent health risk behaviours.» (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants in Study 1 were mothers and their 9-12-year-old children (n = 82); participants in Study 2 (n = 59) were mothers and their 5-12-year-old children. Both samples were drawn from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project (Concordia Project): a prospective, longitudinal, intergenerational study of high-risk children from disadvantaged neighbourhoods that began in 1976-1978. Original participants were screened along dimensions of aggression, social withdrawal, and likeability in childhood, and were followed into parenthood.» (p. iii)

Instruments :
- Questionnaire
- Grille d’observation

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«[R]esults from the present studies underscore the importance of considering emotional development in the parent-child context as a dynamic and far reaching course that impacts parents’ as well as children’s lives in the present and in the future.» (p. 182-183) In the first article, the results «suggests that emotion regulation may be one of the mechanisms explaining the intergenerational transfer of problem behaviours. In addition, mothers’ own emotion regulation behaviours may be associated with their parenting practices, and an association was found between parental support and more adaptive emotion regulation behaviours in children.» (p. 59) In the second article, the study «succeeded in applying a detailed observational measure of emotion regulation behaviours to school aged children and their mothers, examining concurrent and longitudinal outcomes related to observed behaviours […]. [The authors also] demonstrated an association between both mother and child emotion regulation behaviours and overall levels of maternal parenting stress.» (p. 127)