Prospective Associations Between Toddler Televiewing and Subsequent Lifestyle Habits in Adolescence

Prospective Associations Between Toddler Televiewing and Subsequent Lifestyle Habits in Adolescence

Prospective Associations Between Toddler Televiewing and Subsequent Lifestyle Habits in Adolescence

Prospective Associations Between Toddler Televiewing and Subsequent Lifestyle Habits in Adolescences

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Référence bibliographique [20725]

Preventive Medicine, vol. 110, p. 24-30.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]his study specifically examines the degree to which televiewing at age 2 predicts dietary habits, BMI [body mass index], overall screen time, and student engagement at age 13.» (p. 25)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It is hypothesized that early televiewing time will forecast less optimal nutritional intake, body weight, screen time, and student engagement in early adolescence.» (p. 25)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants are from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development coordinated by the Institute de la Statistique du Québec [...]. The predictor variable was collected at age 2 from a subsample of 1985 participants (986 girls and 999 boys) [...].» (p. 25) Les parents ont répondu à des questions concernant les pratiques télévisuelles alors que les adolescents ont répondu à des questions concernant leurs habitudes alimentaires.

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results show that «[i]n preschool, parents use screen time as a reward and as a distraction to establish quiet idling at a teachable moment when children could be learning self-control […]. In fact, using distraction as a reward to help children behave in situations where they should be learning self-control might actually reward distraction. [T]his begins a trajectory that uses distraction when faced with demands for cognitive effort. Rewarding distraction and low mental effort, through greater investment in entertainment as a diversion in adolescence, might influence school commitment and perseverance […]. This supports the existing AAP [American Academy of Pediatrics] guidelines of not > 2 daily hours of discretionary time for school age children to ensure healthy developmental trajectories in adolescence. [Which means that] televiewing beyond the recommended daily allowance of 1 h forecasted less optimal lifestyle habits in early adolescence. Every additional hour of televiewing [that the parents permitted] at age 2 was associated with an average of 12.6% unit decreases of breakfast consumption, 16% unit increases of BMI, 13% unit increases of unhealthy food intake, 9.3% unit increases of concurrent screen time, and 9% unit decreases of student engagement at age 13. This reinforces the importance [for the parents to] respect the new AAP preschool guidelines.» (p. 27)