The Process of Identity Formation for Youth Growing Up in Multicultural Familial Contexts

The Process of Identity Formation for Youth Growing Up in Multicultural Familial Contexts

The Process of Identity Formation for Youth Growing Up in Multicultural Familial Contexts

The Process of Identity Formation for Youth Growing Up in Multicultural Familial Contextss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [20685]

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present research examine[s] the process of identity formation for young people who grew up in multicultural contexts and had at least one parent who belongs to a visible minority.» (p. 74)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«In the present research, ten young people (20-24 years old) who have parents from two different cultures that are different than the Euro-Canadian culture, and at least one parent is considered part of visible minority, were interviewed.» (p. iii) «Six participants were born in Montreal, Quebec and lived there all their lives.» (p. 31) The other four participants were not born in Quebec, but were now living in Montreal.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


Concerning family, results show in particular that «[o]verall, participants described themselves as more open-minded and accepting than their parents when it comes to different values around relationships. In some instances, the conflict may also arise between the participants and other significant people due to different values. One of the participants explained that his girlfriend did not understand his attachment to his family. She considered the fact that he visits his parents every weekend as a sign of lack independence. He viewed it as a culturally important practice in his family, and it is not related to independence. Both his parents’ cultures valued close family relationships and care more than individuality. The participant found himself in a situation in which he is dealing with conflicting values in the Canadian context and in his parents’ contexts.» (p. 57) Moreover, «[t]he management aspect of processing being different includes managing relationships with family members and friends; and managing conflicts that arise in these relationships.» (p. 74)