Perspective of Patients and Caregivers About Stroke Rehabilitation: The Quebec Experience

Perspective of Patients and Caregivers About Stroke Rehabilitation: The Quebec Experience

Perspective of Patients and Caregivers About Stroke Rehabilitation: The Quebec Experience

Perspective of Patients and Caregivers About Stroke Rehabilitation: The Quebec Experiences

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Référence bibliographique [20683]

Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, vol. 26, no 1, p. 39-48.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This study aims «to document experiences and perceptions of people with stroke and their caregivers about the existing continuum of care in the province of Quebec.» (p. 45)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Sixty-eight participants were recruited and attended the 10 focus groups. Thirty-seven were persons with stroke and 31 were relatives of persons with stroke.» (p. 42)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien de groupe

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


Results show that access «to rehabilitation services was an important concern of our participants. Their favorable perceptions of accessibility, however, decrease as they progress in the continuum of care. In other words, if the accessibility to rehabilitation services was deemed rather good in the acute care facilities, it was considered difficult in specialized rehabilitation settings and poor to non-existent in community settings. While the access to acute care rehabilitation services was almost automatic, some participants had to make multiple requests to access specialized rehabilitation services, and still more efforts were required to get services while reintegrating their home.» (p. 45) Concerning family dynamic, caregivers «had difficulty in clearly expressing their own needs when discussing their experiences with the stroke of a family member. They often mentioned that they coveted improved services for their loved ones, but struggled to ask for personal psychological help and support with domestic tasks. They recognized the heavy burden of living with a stroke survivor, but they failed to recognize the need for services for themselves. […] They did, however, acknowledge that they would appreciate support from community organizations and existing healthcare services if such services did not reduce the services available for the person with the stroke.» (p. 45)