Considering the Age-Graded Nature of Associations Between Socioeconomic Characteristics and Smoking During the Transition Towards Adulthood

Considering the Age-Graded Nature of Associations Between Socioeconomic Characteristics and Smoking During the Transition Towards Adulthood

Considering the Age-Graded Nature of Associations Between Socioeconomic Characteristics and Smoking During the Transition Towards Adulthood

Considering the Age-Graded Nature of Associations Between Socioeconomic Characteristics and Smoking During the Transition Towards Adulthoods

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Référence bibliographique [20670]

Preventive Medicine, vol. 123, p. 262-269.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper seeks to demonstrate the age-graded nature of associations between socioeconomic circumstances and smoking behaviour in relation to the transition towards adulthood. To do so, [the authors] examine differences across two-year categories in the associations of young adults’ transition stages and socioeconomic resources with smoking […] in Montreal, Canada.» (p. 263)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The authors «analyzed cross-sectional data from the 2011–2012 panel of the Interdisciplinary Study of Inequalities in Smoking (ISIS) […].» (p. 263) L’échantillon final est composé de 2093 résidents de Montréal âgés entre 18 et 25 ans.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


This study demonstrates that «those in the transition to adulthood face different challenges and role expectations in keeping with the ages at which they navigate milestones and secure resources.» (p. 265) «To operationalize participants’ transition stages, [the authors] examined five indicators related to their living arrangements with parents and children, their student status, their fulltime employment status, and their relationship status […].» (p. 263) Concerning «financial difficulties and living arrangements with parents, [they] did not find differences in their association with smoking outcomes between age groups, supporting the idea that some household circumstances are likely to have a consistent influence on the risk of smoking during the first half of the third decade of life.» (p. 266)