Sources of Evaluation of Parental Behaviors as Predictors of Achievement Outcomes

Sources of Evaluation of Parental Behaviors as Predictors of Achievement Outcomes

Sources of Evaluation of Parental Behaviors as Predictors of Achievement Outcomes

Sources of Evaluation of Parental Behaviors as Predictors of Achievement Outcomess

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Référence bibliographique [20600]

Motivation and Emotion, vol. 42, no 4, p. 513-526.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The objective of this study is «to predict youths’ achievement outcomes […] using parental NSB [need supporting behaviors] and determine if it was more important to consider the source of evaluation of these behaviors […] or the specific NSB being evaluated, regardless of the source of evaluation.» (p. 522)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data come from a longitudinal study on the role of parents in adolescents’ academic and professional development. […] The sample included 435 mother–child dyads and 246 father–child dyads. Children’s mean age […] was 14 years[.] They were nearly all born in the province of Quebec, Canada (94%) and spoke French at home (95%).» (p. 515)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The authors’ findings show among other things that «mothers and fathers appear to play unique roles in promoting students’ educational achievement-related outcomes […]. While mothers’ contribution to achievement outcomes occurred mainly through their child’s perceptions, fathers’ contribution was evidenced from both perspectives. Hence, when students perceived their father as autonomy supportive, and structuring, their achievement and persistence intentions were higher a year later. With respect to paternal involvement, the results unexpectedly revealed that students’ perceptions of paternal involvement predicted lower grades and persistence intentions a year later. An interesting interpretation for this finding is that fathers may become more involved with their child’s academic life when they experience academic difficulties.» (p. 523) Furthermore, «the current findings also suggest that there might be benefits for school-based interventions aiming to increase academic success to target parents. Knowing that students’ grades and intentional persistence can be facilitated by parental NSB, mobilizing parents in supporting their children’s psychological need satisfaction appears to be of prime importance. This can be done through by communicating to parents the importance of their involvement in their children’s schooling, but the equal importance of balancing this involvement with autonomy support and structure […] needs to be stressed.» (p. 523)