Longitudinal Association Between Peer Victimization and Sleep Problems in Preschoolers: The Moderating Role of Parenting

Longitudinal Association Between Peer Victimization and Sleep Problems in Preschoolers: The Moderating Role of Parenting

Longitudinal Association Between Peer Victimization and Sleep Problems in Preschoolers: The Moderating Role of Parenting

Longitudinal Association Between Peer Victimization and Sleep Problems in Preschoolers: The Moderating Role of Parentings

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Référence bibliographique [20595]

Bilodeau, François, Brendgen, Mara, Vitaro, Frank, Côté, Sylvana, Tremblay, Richard E., Touchette, Évelyne, Montplaisir, Jacques-Yves et Boivin, Michel. 2018. «Longitudinal Association Between Peer Victimization and Sleep Problems in Preschoolers: The Moderating Role of Parenting ». Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, vol. 47, no s1, p. S555-S568.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main goal of our study was to investigate whether peer victimization is associated with children’s sleep problems during the preschool years and the potential moderating effect of parental behaviors in this context.» (p. S563)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were part of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD), led by the Institut de la Statistique du Quebec [in 1998.] The present study is based on participants for whom data for peer victimization and sleep problems were available for at least two times points between the ages of 3 and 6 years. […] These criteria resulted in a final study sample of 1,181 children (594 girls, 587 boys).» (p. S558)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In line with findings from studies with older children and teenagers […], being victimized by peers was related to higher levels of parasomnias and insomnia. Our study is the first to show that this association also holds for young children prior to school entry. In fact, repeated peer victimization during the preschool years not only hampered the normative decline of sleep problems in young children but also promoted a further increase of these problems. Sleep disturbances are often among the first symptoms of internalizing problems such as anxiety […]. Our findings also revealed, however, that the predictive effect of peer victimization on children’s sleep problems varied depending on parents’ behaviors. Specifically, chronically peer-victimized children were at risk of maintaining a higher level or of developing even more frequent parasomnias only when their parents showed highly coercive behavior. In contrast, positive parenting seemed to reduce chronically victimized children’s insomnia. Although we did not find main effects but instead moderating effects of parental behaviors, our results nevertheless agree with other research showing that parents’ coercive behaviors are associated with poorer sleep quality in their offspring, whereas positive parenting is linked to a healthier sleep pattern […].» (p. S563)