Gender Differences in Adolescents’ Exposure to Stressful Life Events and Differential Links to Impaired School Functioning

Gender Differences in Adolescents’ Exposure to Stressful Life Events and Differential Links to Impaired School Functioning

Gender Differences in Adolescents’ Exposure to Stressful Life Events and Differential Links to Impaired School Functioning

Gender Differences in Adolescents’ Exposure to Stressful Life Events and Differential Links to Impaired School Functionings

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Référence bibliographique [20594]

Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 47, no 6, p. 1053-1064.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of this study [is] to determine whether exposure or sensitivity to SLE [stressful life events] may have contributed to high school dropout in gender-specific ways, among academically vulnerable adolescent boys and girls.» (p. 1059)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«In terms of hypothesis, it is expected that girls will be exposed to more relational events involving family members, romantic partners or peers (exposure) and that these events will be related more strongly to dropout for them (sensitivity); conversely, SLE related to performance in school or to conflicts with authority figures are expected to be both particularly frequent (exposure) and strongly related to dropout (sensitivity) among boys.» (p. 1055)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 260 filles et de 285 garçons âgés de plus de 14 ans. Cette étude a été conduite dans 12 écoles publiques francophones de la région de Montréal qui présentent un taux élevé de décrochage scolaire.

Instruments :
- Questionnaire
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


The analysis shows that in «general, SLE were similarly present among girls and boys dropping out of school, and these stressors appeared to play a similar precipitating role in both groups, after accounting for other potentially confounding risk factors. Gender-specific findings emerged, however, when distinctions were made between types of stressors. In terms of exposure, compared with their male counterpart, girls who dropped out of school were less exposed to school problems and conflicts with formal authority figures but more exposed to relational SLE involving family members or peers (including romantic partners). In terms of sensitivity, boys consistently showed a particular vulnerability to SLE related to school problems or to conflicts with authority figures.» (p. 1059) «The results also expand extant research by underscoring that SLE, and first and foremost relational events, have the potential to seriously disrupt girls’ schooling trajectories. […] The overrepresentation of concealed relational stressors among girls raises the possibility that girls’ difficulties may go unnoticed or be trivialized […]. To address this gap, school-based programs aimed at reducing abuse and violence in peer and romantic relationships as well as efforts to change gender-related double standards may provide a good starting point […].» (p. 1061)