Parental Involvement in Sport and the Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs: Perspectives from Parent–Child Dyads

Parental Involvement in Sport and the Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs: Perspectives from Parent–Child Dyads

Parental Involvement in Sport and the Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs: Perspectives from Parent–Child Dyads

Parental Involvement in Sport and the Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs: Perspectives from Parent–Child Dyadss

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Référence bibliographique [20524]

International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he purpose of the study [is] to examine parents’ and children’s perspectives on how parental involvement in sport influences basic psychological needs satisfaction.» (p. 3)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Consistent with the study purpose, the research question driving the study was: How do parents and children believe parents’ involvement in sport influences basic psychological needs satisfaction?» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A total of eight athletes (three males, five females, […] age range: 12–16 years) and eight parents (six males, two females, […] age range: 36–53 years) formed the eight parent–child dyads […].» (p. 4) «The participants were recruited from youth sport programmes in the Greater Montreal metropolitan area in the province of Quebec (Canada).» (p. 5)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Overall, it was found that parents were believed to generally satisfy their children’s basic psychological needs in sport. In instances when needs frustration was documented, a lack of communication of expectations between parent and child was often involved. A study strength resides in presenting the results in a dyadic format, meaning that each theme was supported by quotes from a parent and a child within the same dyad. The results contribute to advancing the parenting in sport literature by providing tangible occurrences during which parents and athletes converged or diverged on their perspective of parental involvement in sport. Such results allow for a more nuanced portrait of the behaviours preferred by athletes that parents should consider adopting to promote needs satisfaction and avoid needs frustration.» (p. 15)