Mental Health in the Cree Peoples of Northern Quebec: Relationships Among Trauma, Familial Psychological Distress, and Mood or Anxiety Disorders

Mental Health in the Cree Peoples of Northern Quebec: Relationships Among Trauma, Familial Psychological Distress, and Mood or Anxiety Disorders

Mental Health in the Cree Peoples of Northern Quebec: Relationships Among Trauma, Familial Psychological Distress, and Mood or Anxiety Disorders

Mental Health in the Cree Peoples of Northern Quebec: Relationships Among Trauma, Familial Psychological Distress, and Mood or Anxiety Disorderss

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Référence bibliographique [20481]

Revue canadienne de psychiatrie / Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 64, no 3, p. 180-189.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study aimed to measure physical health, lifetime rates of anxiety and mood disorders, and substance dependence among a […] Cree communities in Northern Quebec.» (p. 181)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«[A] total of 506 randomly selected individuals from 4 of the 9 Cree communities from Northern Quebec were included in this study.» (p. 182)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Overall, compared with the Canadian general population, Cree adults in this study experienced higher rates of physical (26.1% v. 47.1%) and sexual (10.1% v. 29.7%) abuse. Being female, history of physical or sexual abuse, problems with family, and substance abuse were significant predictors of the presence of anxiety and mood disorders in the hierarchical regression model. The relationship among experiences of physical and sexual abuse, substance use problems, depression, anxiety, and suicide ideation and attempts has been demonstrated along with the presence of intergenerational transmission of violence and substance abuse among an urban Aboriginal population. Aboriginal women are also more likely to live in environments in which substance abuse and domestic violence are widespread. It is important to consider both the individual effects and the broader historical context within which intergenerational trauma has been experienced by Aboriginal peoples. Health disparities are directly and indirectly related to many factors, including social, economic, cultural, and political inequities. Aboriginal communities have consistently attributed the disproportionate rates of psychological distress to their historical experiences of colonialism, including community dislocation and placement of children into residential schools. With the current legislation governing child welfare, it is estimated that there are 3 times as many Aboriginal children being removed from their families than at the height of the residential school system.» (p. 186)