Parental-Leave Policy for Male Lawyers in Helsinki and Montreal: Cultural and Professional Barriers to Male Lawyers’ Use of Paternity and Parental Leaves

Parental-Leave Policy for Male Lawyers in Helsinki and Montreal: Cultural and Professional Barriers to Male Lawyers’ Use of Paternity and Parental Leaves

Parental-Leave Policy for Male Lawyers in Helsinki and Montreal: Cultural and Professional Barriers to Male Lawyers’ Use of Paternity and Parental Leaves

Parental-Leave Policy for Male Lawyers in Helsinki and Montreal: Cultural and Professional Barriers to Male Lawyers’ Use of Paternity and Parental Leavess

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Référence bibliographique [20469]

Tremblay, Diane-Gabrielle et Choroszewicz, Marta. 2018. «Parental-Leave Policy for Male Lawyers in Helsinki and Montreal: Cultural and Professional Barriers to Male Lawyers’ Use of Paternity and Parental Leaves ». International Journal of the Legal Profession, vol. 25, no 3, p. 303-316.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
In this study, authors «have examined the use of paternity and parental leaves and the motives behind their decisions among male lawyers in Helsinki and Montreal.» (p. 313)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample is composed of 38 «male lawyers who work or have worked in private law practice. The empirical material originates from two separate sets of interviews conducted in 2011, when six Quebecois male lawyers were interviewed, and in 2016, when 20 Finnish male lawyers and 12 Quebecois male lawyers were interviewed.» (p. 306-307) They come from various law firms in Helsinki and Montreal.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


Results show that the «use of paternity leave, particularly the portion of it that can be combined with maternity leave, is less stigmatised among lawyers in Finland, probably owing to its longer tradition and national outreach. In Montreal, paternity leave policy is relatively young and is limited to the Québec province. To avoid jeopardising their careers, Quebecois male lawyers refrain from using parental leave and instead use annual holiday time. Additionally, work organisation at Finnish law firms enables men to use paternity leave, especially if they are at an early stage in their careers. However, more individualistic work organisation at law firms in Montreal – which places extensive expectations on young lawyers in the areas of marketing, networking and recruiting potential clients – discourages their use of paternity leave. Only those who feel very confident about their careers and have collegial support from their peers take the leave. While society has evolved in Finland and Québec, where fathers are offered paternity leave and the chance to share parental leave, the gendered organisation of work in law firms does not yet acknowledge men as caregiving parents. Thus, the existence of paternity leave at law firms is not enough to make men feel comfortable using it if there are few incentives. Law firms are doing very little to encourage male lawyers to claim their statutory rights as fathers.» (p. 313-314)