Harsh Parenting Practices Mediate the Association Between Parent Affective Profiles and Child Adjustment Outcomes

Harsh Parenting Practices Mediate the Association Between Parent Affective Profiles and Child Adjustment Outcomes

Harsh Parenting Practices Mediate the Association Between Parent Affective Profiles and Child Adjustment Outcomes

Harsh Parenting Practices Mediate the Association Between Parent Affective Profiles and Child Adjustment Outcomess

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Référence bibliographique [20468]

Orri, Massimiliano, Girard, Lisa-Christine, Pingault, Jean-Baptiste, Rouquette, Alexandra, Herba, Catherine, Falissard, Bruno, Côté, Sylvana M. et Berthoz, Sylvie. 2018. «Harsh Parenting Practices Mediate the Association Between Parent Affective Profiles and Child Adjustment Outcomes ». International Journal of Behavioral Development, vol. 43, no 1, p. 53-60.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This article aims «to investigate the associations between mothers’ and fathers’ affective profiles and offspring externalizing and internalizing behaviours, and if these associations are mediated by harsh parental practices.» (p. 54)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Authors hypothesized «parental negative and positive emotionality to have opposite effects, and […] harsh parenting to mediate the association between parents’ emotionality and offspring behaviours. [They] expected this mediation effect to be stronger for fathers than mothers.» (p. 54)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants included families with a child born between June 2003 and April 2004 in Montreal, Canada, enrolled in the EMIGARDE cohort. […] Parent’s affective dimensions were assessed in a subsample of parents, thus the final sample resulted in n=290 triads […].» (p. 54)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results show that the «three empirically derived affective profiles are qualitatively similar for mothers and fathers, and the negative emotions (FEAR, ANGER and SADNESS) are those that most discriminate between the three profiles. The low negative emotions profile (in which positive emotions are frequent) and the high emotional profile (in which negative emotions are frequent) have opposite effects. The former is associated with low scores on both internalizing and externalizing behaviours, and the latter with high scores. In the same way, compared to parents having a balanced profile, those having a low negative emotions profile used less harsh parenting practices, whereas those having a high emotional profile used more harsh parenting practices. […] Although mothers’ and fathers’ profiles were qualitatively similar, our findings suggest that they contribute differently to their offspring’s behavioural development (internalizing or externalizing behaviours), act through different mechanisms (direct or indirect), and depend on the sex of the child. For boys, the association between mothers’ low negative emotions and high emotional profiles and internalizing behaviours (direct effect) were stronger than for the corresponding fathers’ profiles. The indirect effect of fathers’ low negative emotions profile on externalizing behaviours was stronger than the corresponding indirect effect of the mothers’ profile. For girls, only mothers’ profiles (low negative emotions and high emotional) showed significant associations with internalizing and externalizing behaviours.» (p. 57-58)