Young Women’s Acknowledgment of Reproductive Coercion: A Qualitative Analysis

Young Women’s Acknowledgment of Reproductive Coercion: A Qualitative Analysis

Young Women’s Acknowledgment of Reproductive Coercion: A Qualitative Analysis

Young Women’s Acknowledgment of Reproductive Coercion: A Qualitative Analysiss

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Référence bibliographique [20410]

Journal of Interpersonal Violence, p. 1-24.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study examines the reports of young women who wanted to share their experiences to help deconstruct the stigma, shame, and guilt associated with violent and RC [Reproductive coercion] behavior perpetuated by their partners.» (p. 19)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Authors address the following question: «[h]ow does the RC acknowledgment process take place according to its different forms? […] How does the relational context influence RC acknowledgment? […] Which factors facilitate RC acknowledgment, and which contexts and factors impede it?» (p. 7)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 21 jeunes femmes québécoises âgées entre 18 et 29 ans qui ont déjà expérimenté de la coercition reproductive.

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif
- Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results show, that «participants had experienced various forms of RC, and in different relational contexts […]. All participants who said they had been in an intermittent uncommitted relationship reported nonconsensual condom removal. This manifestation of RC also occurred in repetitive uncommitted relationships and in couple relationships in which violence was present. Pregnancy pressure (encouragement or discouragement) and pregnancy coercion (forced continuation or termination) were present only in couple or repetitive uncommitted relationships. Only one participant reported incidents of control or constraint over the use of her contraceptive method when she was in a couple relationship without violence. Participants may have experienced RC in more than one relationship during the surveyed period. As a result, the number of reported situations exceeds the number of participants.» (p. 9) «The participants’ statements also revealed factors that impeded RC acknowledgment: refusal to self-identify as a victim, assuming responsibility for the incident, having limited knowledge about sexual aggression, and being in a violent relationship. […] For instance, some women avoid acknowledging that they experienced sexual aggression so as not to be labeled a victim, which would mean being perceived as vulnerable, controlled, and powerless […]. Furthermore, many women do not acknowledge that they were sexually assaulted because they blame themselves, maintaining that they acted recklessly […].» (p. 19)