A Child Wanted by Two, Conceived by Several: Lesbian-Parent Families Negotiating Procreation with a Known Donor

A Child Wanted by Two, Conceived by Several: Lesbian-Parent Families Negotiating Procreation with a Known Donor

A Child Wanted by Two, Conceived by Several: Lesbian-Parent Families Negotiating Procreation with a Known Donor

A Child Wanted by Two, Conceived by Several: Lesbian-Parent Families Negotiating Procreation with a Known Donors

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Référence bibliographique [20409]

Journal of GLBT Family Studies, vol. 15, no 2, p. 165-185.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This research aims to analyze the family pathways of [lesbian-parent] families to pinpoint the evolution of the donors’ role and the elements likely to transform the relationship (or lack thereof) they have with the children born of their donations.» (p. 167)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data presented in this article come from a larger study launched in 2010 among lesbian-parent families in Quebec, founded with the help of a known sperm donor and whose children were all born after the law on new rules of filiation was enacted in 2002.» (p. 169) Pour cette présente étude, l’échantillon est composé de 36 personnes: 10 couples lesbiens, 11 donneurs et 5 conjoints de donneurs.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


According to the results, several «participants mentioned being in a process of “establishing new family dynamics” without having specific parameters or a model on which to rely, because assisted reproduction using a known donor is still a marginal practice that is not very well documented, whether by the scientific community, social health organizations, or GLBT [gay, bisexual, and transgender] associations. Consequently, each family had to define and realize its own concept of the donor’s role. Donors’ involvement in the parental project of others thus reflected how they translated their role into concrete actions. This is especially relevant given that the donor role is not a set concept, but rather one that evolves continuously over time. The participants, who were all too aware that it is not possible to predict the future, expressed a high degree of flexibility and openness to potential changes in this role, for example based on eventual requests from the child regarding the donor, or personal and family events such as a move to another region or country. The negotiations represent a pivotal and decisive interaction that helps maintain positive relational dynamics in the face of various critical events marking and modifying the numerous individual pathways of the men and women concerned.» (p. 171)