Between Struggle and Hope: Understanding the Oral Care Experiences of Children Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); A Parent’s Perspective

Between Struggle and Hope: Understanding the Oral Care Experiences of Children Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); A Parent’s Perspective

Between Struggle and Hope: Understanding the Oral Care Experiences of Children Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); A Parent’s Perspective

Between Struggle and Hope: Understanding the Oral Care Experiences of Children Living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD); A Parent’s Perspectives

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]his research aims to provide an in-depth exploration of the child oral care experiences and concerns of parents of children living with ASD [autism spectrum disorder].» (p. 11)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«How do parents experience the oral care of their children who live with ASD?» (p. 20)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de six parents d’enfant vivant avec un trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA). Les participants ont été recrutés par le biais de trois centres montréalais offrant des services aux enfants vivant avec un TSA.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The interpretation of [the parents’] accounts revealed three broad findings in the care of their child’s oral health, namely, “Oral care as a struggle”, “struggling with(out) giving up” and “Oral care as a Hope”, along with other subordinate themes.» (p. 11) Results show that «the experience of parents with the oral care of their ASD children was one of struggle, wanting to give up and hope. The experience of struggle was mainly related to factors related to the child itself, including ASD-related factors that made oral hygiene activities, like brushing, difficult.» (p. 71) «The findings also showed that parents struggled with the vacillating behaviour of their children during oral hygiene process. The children would accept the tooth brushing for a period of time and then suddenly refuse it without any obvious reason. Parents mentioned trying to use rewards as positive reinforcement to accommodate such instances. However, the usual rewards did not work as the children grew and parents struggled to find new rewards to encourage their children to practice the oral hygiene as before.» (p. 72) Other problems appaered around «lack of knowledge of ASD in the dental team (dentists and hygienists) and frequent miscommunications were described by parents.» (p. 72)