Rethinking Canadian Economic Growth and Development since 1900: The Quebec Case

Rethinking Canadian Economic Growth and Development since 1900: The Quebec Case

Rethinking Canadian Economic Growth and Development since 1900: The Quebec Case

Rethinking Canadian Economic Growth and Development since 1900: The Quebec Cases

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Référence bibliographique [20116]

Rethinking Canadian Economic Growth and Development since 1900: The Quebec Case. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
L’auteur brosse un portrait du développement social et économique au Québec depuis le début du XXe siècle. Le cinquième chapitre se concentre sur les changements sociaux (mariages, natalité, divorce, relation avec l’Église) pour la période de la Grande Noirceur, soit 1945-1960.

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«[T]his book […] places the case of Québec into the wider question of convergence in economic history and whether proactive governments delay of halt convergence. The period from 1945 to 1960, infamously labeled the Great Gloom (Grande Noirceur), was in fact a breaking point where the previous decades of relative decline were overturned […]. In opposition, the Quiet Revolution that followed after 1960 did not accelerate these trends. In fact, there are signs of slowing down and relative decline that appear after the 1970s. The author posits that the Quiet Revolution sowed the seeds for growth slowdown by crowding-out social capital and inciting rent-seeking behaviour on the part of interest groups.» (quatrième de couverture) Chapter 5 looks at the changing social behaviours of Quebecers for that period, in particular the behaviours linked to marriages, birthrates, divorces, and the regression of the church’s influence. On this subject, the author mentions that «[s]tarting after the war, there were more divorces and fewer marriages. Québec women came to realize that they could aspire to a better life than one that confined them to a household under their husband’s purview. The baby boom was more pronounced in Québec than in Ontario, but there was nonetheless a radical drop in birthrates […].» (p. 85)