Marital and Cohabiting Union Dissolution in Middle and Later Life

Marital and Cohabiting Union Dissolution in Middle and Later Life

Marital and Cohabiting Union Dissolution in Middle and Later Life

Marital and Cohabiting Union Dissolution in Middle and Later Lifes

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [19991]

Wu, Zheng et Penning, Margaret J. 2018. «Marital and Cohabiting Union Dissolution in Middle and Later Life ». Research on Aging, vol. 40, no 4, p. 340-364.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«With an overall objective of contributing to theoretical and empirical understanding of union dissolution in middle and later life, we explore the role of marital and family biography in influencing union dissolution among men and women in the middle and later years of life. Moreover, we do so in a Canadian context, characterized by profound differences in marital and cohabitation patterns, particularly when comparing Québec residents to those in other provinces.» (p. 345)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We draw on retrospective (survival) data on union histories from the 2007 Canadian General Social Survey, Cycle 21 (GSS21), conducted with a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized Canadian population aged 45 and older.» (p. 342)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«First, our findings revealed that those in cohabiting unions at age 45 had already been in these unions for an average of 10 years, providing some indication of the stability of many of these relationships. Yet, those in cohabiting relationships faced a significantly greater risk of union disruption than those who were married. […] Second, when it came to aspects of union biography, […] we found union duration prior to age 45 to be unrelated to subsequent union dissolution when overall union dissolution (combining marital and cohabiting unions) was examined. In addition, prior union duration was positively rather than negatively related to midlife and later-life union dissolution among married men (but not women) and negatively related to union dissolution only among cohabiting women and men. [T]he finding that Quebec residence increased the likelihood of cohabitation but also contributed to marital but not cohabiting union instability in middle- and later-life supports findings previously reported for samples including younger adults (e.g., Ménard, 2011). Thus, it appears that for middle-aged and older adults as well, as marriage has weakened in the province, thereby generating higher dissolution rates, cohabitation has become more common and no longer has distinctive effects on outcomes such as union stability […].» (p. 357-358)