Initiation of Addiction Treatment and Access to Services: Young Adults’ Accounts of their Help-Seeking Experiences

Initiation of Addiction Treatment and Access to Services: Young Adults’ Accounts of their Help-Seeking Experiences

Initiation of Addiction Treatment and Access to Services: Young Adults’ Accounts of their Help-Seeking Experiences

Initiation of Addiction Treatment and Access to Services: Young Adults’ Accounts of their Help-Seeking Experiencess

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Référence bibliographique [19990]

Qualitative Health Research, vol. 27, no 11, p. 1614-1627.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he aim of this study is to explore—considering the very own users’ perspective—the process of substance misuse treatment initiation. Precisely, we will focus here on the first step of a treatment process—among perhaps multiple past service utilizations—of young adults with problematic alcohol or drug use.» (p. 1615)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample recruited for the larger project included 127 participants, whose problematic substance use was detected at one of the points of entry in Montréal [...] and Mauricie-Centre-du-Québec [...]: criminal courts, hospital emergency departments, and Health and Social Services Centers (HSSC). […] For the present study—focusing on young adults—only participants aged 18 to 30 were retained (N = 35/127).» (p. 1615-1616)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Three components emerged from this study: «personal elements linked to treatment initiation, the roles of immediate family members and peers, and influences of system characteristics, including health and social […] professionals.» (p. 1617) The results reveal that «a young substance user’s immediate family often has a positive effect on treatment initiation. […] First, parents and lovers are the ones who worry about substance misuse. Occasionally, some initiate the process and then present it to, or impose it on, the young user. Subsequently, few users agree to contact health services, not for their own benefit, but first and foremost to please their relatives, redeem themselves, and/or ease tensions. […] We also note that participants are committed to contacting a professional in response to a relative’s or friend’s distress or sadness. Guilt toward family, a lover, or children is also sometimes used to justify and facilitate a request for help. […] Less often, some participants said they are afraid to seek care because of the reactions of the people around them. Acknowledging the problem is a source of family conflict or amplifies this conflict. […] Most young adults perceive their parents as useful sources of information and support when they first seek treatment.» (p. 1620)