Lifestyle-Related Factors Associated with Reproductive Health in Couples Seeking Fertility Treatments: Results of A Pilot Study

Lifestyle-Related Factors Associated with Reproductive Health in Couples Seeking Fertility Treatments: Results of A Pilot Study

Lifestyle-Related Factors Associated with Reproductive Health in Couples Seeking Fertility Treatments: Results of A Pilot Study

Lifestyle-Related Factors Associated with Reproductive Health in Couples Seeking Fertility Treatments: Results of A Pilot Studys

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Référence bibliographique [19944]

International Journal of Fertility and Sterility, vol. 12, no 1, p. 19-26.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In this pilot study, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting a […] prospective cohort study that will aim at determining the independent contribution of male and female lifestyle-related factors to ART [assisted reproductive technology] success. The study also examined whether couples seeking fertility treatments present unfavorable lifestyle-related factors that may interfere with their reproductive health and evaluated possible differences in these factors between men and women.» (p. 20)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample counts 28 «[h]eterosexual couples seeking fertility treatments for the first time […]. Recruitment took place at the fertility clinic of the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire régional (CHAUR) de Trois-Rivières [...] between May 2015 and February 2016. […] The couples were followed-up for six months to assess ART success, defined as the confirmation of a clinical pregnancy.» (p. 20)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our preliminary results […] showed that many couples seeking infertility treatments present unfavourable lifestyle-related factors that may explain, at least partially, their difficulty in conceiving and affect future infertility treatment outcomes. Importantly, 41% of women and 9% of men presented at least four adverse factors that may have a negative impact on reproductive health. […] Despite, the recommendation that people trying to conceive should not drink alcohol […], we found that 82% of women and 86% of men were still drinking alcohol at the time they were seeking infertility treatments. [W]omen of our study who are trying to conceive, slightly decrease their caffeine intake. […] Finally, other lifestyle habits, such as nutrition, physical activity and sleeping habits may have a negative impact on fertility and ART outcome, but the currently available evidence is inconclusive.» (p. 23-24)