Does Quebec’s Subsidized Child Care Policy Give Boys and Girls an Equal Start?

Does Quebec’s Subsidized Child Care Policy Give Boys and Girls an Equal Start?

Does Quebec’s Subsidized Child Care Policy Give Boys and Girls an Equal Start?

Does Quebec’s Subsidized Child Care Policy Give Boys and Girls an Equal Start?s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [19878]

Kottelenberg, Michael J. et Lehrer, Steven F. 2018. «Does Quebec’s Subsidized Child Care Policy Give Boys and Girls an Equal Start? ». Revue canadienne d’économique / Canadian Journal of Economics, vol. 51, no 2, p. 627-659.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Our study [explores] whether there are differential gender policy effects resulting from the only large-scale universal subsidization of child care in North America. […] Second, since prior research in labour economics documents that reporting only the mean effects of a policy may mask policy relevant heterogeneity, we additionally contribute to the literature by exploring whether this policy changed any of the first four moments of the distribution of child outcomes for both girls and boys in Quebec.» (p. 628-629)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We use the first seven cycles of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth (NLSCY), a nationally representative longitudinal study tracking cohorts of Canadian children from early childhood.» (p. 632-633)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This paper extends earlier research evaluating the developmental consequences of the Quebec Family Policy by first documenting that the reductions in four of the six child developmental and behavioural measures reported in earlier research are driven by children of one gender. Once subsidized child care is made available, only boys face statistically significant reductions in motor social development and increased hyperactivity and inattention scores. However, formal tests reject that the estimated average policy effect between boys and girls is statistically significant differences for each child developmental, behavioural and health outcome. In addition, we find significant evidence of differential parenting practices by child gender in response to the policy. When we account for these changes in household environment and investment decisions assuming they are exogenous, we find substantial reductions in average policy effects. These results are suggestive that behavioural responses in the home related to child investments are likely one of the main mechanisms through which this child care reform negatively affected many child outcomes.» (p. 652-653) Further, «[w]e find that the availability of subsidized child care generally increased the variation in most child outcomes excluding separation anxiety for both boys and girls, suggesting within gender that children are getting off to different starts.» (p. 653)