Fathers on Parental Leave: An Analysis of Rights and Take-Up in 29 Countries

Fathers on Parental Leave: An Analysis of Rights and Take-Up in 29 Countries

Fathers on Parental Leave: An Analysis of Rights and Take-Up in 29 Countries

Fathers on Parental Leave: An Analysis of Rights and Take-Up in 29 Countries

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Référence bibliographique [19874]

Karu, Marre et Tremblay, Diane-Gabrielle. 2018. «Fathers on Parental Leave: An Analysis of Rights and Take-Up in 29 Countries ». Community, Work & Family, vol. 21, no 3, p. 344-362.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper seeks to compare key characteristics of the policy rights of fathers and the evidence on the take-up of parental leave in 29 countries. Analysis shows a vast variety between countries in the duration of leave, generosity of benefits and existence of fathers’ quotas.» (p. 345)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«The study shows that the father’s quotas are no longer exclusive to the Nordic countries. We found 17 countries which have provided fathers with an individual non-transferable leave rights while the number of countries where fathers are proven to share a significant share of leaves has not increased. […] The evidence shows a reasonably high take-up of parental leave only in countries where there is a combination of fathers’ quota and high level of benefit. There is no evidence that any other combination would lead to high take-up by fathers. […] We also notice that countries with high and moderate take-up can be found mainly in one geographical area – the ‘old’ Europe and particularly the Nordic countries. […] In Québec, both the share of fathers using their leave rights and the average duration of the leave is comparable to Sweden, Norway and Iceland.» (p. 356) «The example of Québec shows that the policy can change the behaviour, but also it is significant to note that there was a relatively high take-up already prior to the scheme. In 2004, 22% of fathers used some leave (which was much higher than the 9% in other parts of Canada).» (p. 353)