Quality of Life of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Infertile Patients in a Publicly Funded In Vitro Fertilisation Program: A Cross-Sectional Study

Quality of Life of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Infertile Patients in a Publicly Funded In Vitro Fertilisation Program: A Cross-Sectional Study

Quality of Life of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Infertile Patients in a Publicly Funded In Vitro Fertilisation Program: A Cross-Sectional Study

Quality of Life of Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Infertile Patients in a Publicly Funded In Vitro Fertilisation Program: A Cross-Sectional Studys

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Référence bibliographique [19860]

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 124, no 12, p. 1841-1847.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of our study was to compare socio-demographic parameters and QoL [quality of life] of infertile immigrant and non-immigrant patients, when cost of treatment is removed from the equation.» (p. 1842)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 967 participants ayant fréquenté le Centre de santé de l’Université McGill, à Montréal. En tout, 77% des répondants étaient des citoyens canadiens, et 22,3% étaient des immigrants.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This study showed that infertile immigrants differed from Canadian citizens in several ways. Immigrants were more likely to be of lower SES [socio-economic status] with higher proportion of unemployment and lower annual household income. […] On the other hand, the proportion of patients with university or graduate degrees was higher among immigrants. […] Immigrants reported poorer fertility QoL compared with non-immigrants under the same governmental funding and although there was no financial burden. These patients experience their infertility and its treatment with more distressing emotions, negative thinking, physical symptomatology and less social support. They also found the clinic environment as more problematic and they expressed less tolerability to treatment.» (p. 1845)