Aging Experiences of Older Immigrant Women in Québec (Canada): From Deskilling to Liberation

Aging Experiences of Older Immigrant Women in Québec (Canada): From Deskilling to Liberation

Aging Experiences of Older Immigrant Women in Québec (Canada): From Deskilling to Liberation

Aging Experiences of Older Immigrant Women in Québec (Canada): From Deskilling to Liberations

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Référence bibliographique [19791]

Journal of Women & Aging, vol. 29, no 5, p. 437-447.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article examines experiences of aging of older immigrant women.» (p. 437)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«What does it mean to older women to grow old in a land of immigration? What are the effects of immigration on their living conditions, especially when they have immigrated after 50?» (p. 437)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Our final sample comprised 83 older women immigrants, who took part in 18 group interviews. The women were between 58 and 88 years of age […].» (p. 440) «They were from four continents and 17 different countries […].» (p. 440)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien de groupe

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«For [these women], aging is accompanied by major challenges associated with their life paths: solitude, assistance and care of loved ones, economic insecurity, and vulnerability to violence […].» (p. 445) «With respect to identity, the interviews with these women reveal their strong capacity for adaptation. For them, aging is not only experienced as loss—far from it: They speak rather of gains in terms of their identity. Migration has meant they can grow old and enjoy more security and also more freedom as women to dress as they like, go out on their own, etc.» (p. 446) «The possibility for personal development is accentuated by the relaxing of women’s family responsibilities and their new living arrangements. In contrast to preconceived notions, the vast majority of respondents live alone or with their husband. [Moreover, many women] talked about the changes in their marriage and family dynamics after settling in Québec, especially in relation to family roles, and the more equal distribution of household chores and parental responsibilities. […] Furthermore, the criminalization of domestic violence in Québec gives women the possibility of escaping [situations of abuse that could be tolerated in their homeland].» (p. 444-445) In general, «[o]ur analysis reveals women’s desire to distance themselves from the omnipresent stereotypes generated by the interacting effects of ageism, sexism, and racism that assail them, here and elsewhere.» (p. 446)