Links Between the Mother-Adolescent and Father-Adolescent Relationships and Adolescent Depression: A Genetically Informed Study

Links Between the Mother-Adolescent and Father-Adolescent Relationships and Adolescent Depression: A Genetically Informed Study

Links Between the Mother-Adolescent and Father-Adolescent Relationships and Adolescent Depression: A Genetically Informed Study

Links Between the Mother-Adolescent and Father-Adolescent Relationships and Adolescent Depression: A Genetically Informed Studys

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Référence bibliographique [19783]

Brouillard, Charlie, Brendgen, Mara, Vitaro, Frank, Dionne, Ginette et Boivin, Michel. 2017. «Links Between the Mother-Adolescent and Father-Adolescent Relationships and Adolescent Depression: A Genetically Informed Study ». Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, p. 1-12.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study aimed to examine the unique roles of support and conflict in the relationship with the mother and the father in predicting changes in adolescents’ depressive symptoms over a 1-year period. We also investigated whether these associations varied according to either the offspring’s or the parent’s sex, or adolescents’ genetic vulnerability to depressive symptoms.» (p. 7)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The present study utilized a genetically informative design based on a sample of 121 monozygotic (MZ) and 88 dizygotic (DZ) same-sex twin pairs (i.e., 418 individuals; 52.2% girls) assessed in Grade 8 […] and in Grade 9 […]. They were part of a population-based sample of 467 MZ and same-sex dizygotic DZ twin pairs from the greater Montreal area, who were recruited at birth between November 1995 and July 1998». (p. 3-4)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«As expected, and in accordance with previous studies […], the relationship quality with both parents was related to adolescents’ depressive symptoms 1 year later. However, only a lack of support in the relationship with the father was predictive of both girls’ and boys’ depressive symptoms, regardless of their genetic vulnerability for internalizing problems. By the same token, this finding indicates that a high level of support from the father seems to help protect adolescents of both sexes from internalizing problems. This unique and extensive protective role of paternal support on adolescents’ adjustment may be due to the specific form of support provided by fathers. [F]athers may provide support to their offspring that is oriented toward active coping strategies and problem solving, which may foster adolescents’ sense of competency and autonomy and protect them from developing internalized difficulties. […] Regarding the relationship with the mother, results revealed that high levels of support from the mother was related to an increase in boys’—but not girls’—depressive symptoms, but only when they were at high genetic risk of developing internalizing problems. Although seemingly counterintuitive at first, this finding suggests that excessive parental support may in some cases become detrimental to adolescents’ adjustment.» (p. 7-8)