Domestic Violence Reported to the Police: Correlates of Victims’ Reporting Behavior and Support to Legal Proceedings

Domestic Violence Reported to the Police: Correlates of Victims’ Reporting Behavior and Support to Legal Proceedings

Domestic Violence Reported to the Police: Correlates of Victims’ Reporting Behavior and Support to Legal Proceedings

Domestic Violence Reported to the Police: Correlates of Victims’ Reporting Behavior and Support to Legal Proceedingss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [19636]

Violence and Victims, vol. 31, no 3, p. 402-415.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Factors affecting victim’s use of the criminal justice system have been the subject of only a few empirical studies and victim decisions have often been analyzed as a “static single-stage phenomenon” […]. A limited number of studies have recognized that victims change their minds about prosecution but have analyzed victim decisions independently […]. This article aims to go a step further by investigating whether two decisions—the decision to call the police and the initial willingness to press charges against the assailant, as expressed to police officers shortly after their intervention—are interdependent.» (p. 405)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The analysis is based on cases of assaults between partners or ex-partners recorded by the police in a large urban city in the province of Quebec, Canada, in 2008. Incident reports were obtained for a sample of 967 cases. The narratives from all incident reports were read and codified by a team of researchers.» (p. 406)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The analysis […] shows that official statistics include a more diverse range of DV [domestic violence] situations and make it possible to quantify them. The most prevalent group […] seem to correspond to victims who use the criminal justice system rationally to resolve a problematic situation […]. However, two other groups of victims were also identified. Group 2 (24.0%) includes incidents that were reported to the police by victims who did not want to press charges. This group is consistent with previous studies that showed that the most common reasons for calling the police is to stop the current incident and suppress an immediate threat […]. Finally, Group 3 […] is the unexpected one: It includes third party—reported incidents after which victims expressed their willingness to press charges.» (p. 410) «[T]he analysis supports the idea that seeking help from the police is a dynamic behavior and involves a more complex decision than is often assumed. Supplementary analyses (not shown) do indicate that victims who called the police themselves were almost 5 times more likely to be willing to press charges against their offenders. […] These findings can be related to current debates on the nature of policies adopted by the criminal justice system.» (p. 410)