Parental Social Capital and Children’s Sleep Disturbances

Parental Social Capital and Children’s Sleep Disturbances

Parental Social Capital and Children’s Sleep Disturbances

Parental Social Capital and Children’s Sleep Disturbancess

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Référence bibliographique [19624]

Sleep Health, vol. 2, no 4, p. 330-334.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The following study examines whether parental social capital is associated with sleep disturbances in children, after controlling for potentially confounding parental and child characteristics, including age, sex, ethnicity, and household income.» (p. 331)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It is hypothesized that higher parental social capital will be associated with fewer sleep disturbances in children.» (p. 331)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data were obtained on 339 children and their parents residing in the Montreal Metropolitan Area.» (p. 332)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The current study found that higher parental capital was associated with fewer sleep disturbances in children aged 6 to 12 years. Little research has examined the association between parental social capital and children’s sleep despite evidence that other parental characteristics are important predictors of children’s sleep, and that social capital is associated with a range of other health-related outcomes in children. Given the complex relationship between the broader social environment and children’s sleep, there may be several mechanisms at play in the association between parental social capital and sleep disturbances in children. […] Besides social support, social influence mechanisms may also shape the sleep behavior and health of children through shared rules and social controls. Parents with greater social capital resources may establish, role model, and better enforce a wider range of behavioral norms that may influence children’s sleep, for example, sedentary behavior, physical activity, or diet. Having higher social capital may also reflect access to a wider range of information and other resources that could benefit children’s health.» (p. 333)