Investigating Changes in the Screening Process for Sexual Abuse

Investigating Changes in the Screening Process for Sexual Abuse

Investigating Changes in the Screening Process for Sexual Abuse

Investigating Changes in the Screening Process for Sexual Abuses

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Référence bibliographique [19518]

On the Radar, vol. 2, no 8, p. 1-6.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In light of the complex incidence of CSA [child sex abuse] trends in Quebec and the few studies that have investigated organizational factors potentially impacting these rates, the current study aimed to analyze variables related to the screening process in Quebec CPS [child protective services] agencies over a 10 year period, as a way to better understand screening processes of CSA situations and their potential influence on the rates of confirmed CSA cases.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The database used in this study consists of datasets representing the entire population of children that came into contact with CPS between 2002 and 2013, which were retrieved from the computerized client information system utilized by 16 CPS agencies across the province of Québec. The longitudinal administrative data contained a number of variables regarding the children, their family, and the organization of services. Cases involving a situation of CSA […] were selected. The final sample consisted of 53 848 files.» (p. 2)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This study looked at six variables in order to determine which factors influenced the odds that a report would be screened in or out of CPS agencies in the province of Québec over a 10-year period. Two characteristics of the child, gender and age at the time of the report, were examined. Gender did not have a statistically significant effect on the screening decision, but age did. Younger children were more likely to be screened in (0-12 years), and adolescents (13-17 years) were more likely to be screened out. […] Three administrative characteristics were examined: the CPS status at the time that the report was received, the source of the report, and the number of days the intake worker took to make a decision. Findings show that, beyond the child’s age, a child that was already receiving CPS services was more likely to be screened in if a new report was received. […] When the source of the report was personal (e.g., the child himself or a family member), a private professional (e.g., a doctor or a lawyer), or “other” category, the report was more likely to be screened in. This suggests that greater credibility is given to a child that discloses CSA, and they can provide first-hand information on the abuse.» (p. 4-5)