Conflict Resolution Patterns and Violence Perpetration in Adolescent Couples: A Gender-Sensitive Mixed-Methods Approach

Conflict Resolution Patterns and Violence Perpetration in Adolescent Couples: A Gender-Sensitive Mixed-Methods Approach

Conflict Resolution Patterns and Violence Perpetration in Adolescent Couples: A Gender-Sensitive Mixed-Methods Approach

Conflict Resolution Patterns and Violence Perpetration in Adolescent Couples: A Gender-Sensitive Mixed-Methods Approachs

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Référence bibliographique [19462]

Journal of Adolescence, vol. 49, p. 51-59.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This study «aimed to explore conflict resolution strategies in adolescent dating couples, and […] to document, from both the perspective of the individual and couple, dyadic interaction patterns distinguishing youth inflicting DV [dating violence] from those who do not.» (p. 53)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants consisted of 39 young heterosexual couples aged 15-20 years […] recruited through youth organizations from the Greater Montreal […].» (p. 53)

Instruments :
- Questionnaire
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The first type of [conflict resolution] strategy observed in the present study consists of negotiating respective needs and expectations by emphasizing self-affirmation and problem-solving. This strategy appears closely related to the Integrative pattern characterized by a good ability to negotiate differences. The second type, conflict avoidance or avoidance of resolution, shares some resemblance to the Downplaying pattern characterized by a high tendency to minimize the conflict. The third type of strategy, which consists of imposing rules and needs to the partner by resorting to acts of violence, is similar to the Conflictive pattern. Findings from the quantitative phase of this study suggest that communication skills for both genders and positive affects for boys were the individual dimensions most frequently observed during interactions. On a dyadic level, both positive and negative communication skills were equally exhibited during partner interactions. Compared to non-perpetrators, adolescent boys and girls who inflicting [sic] at least one type of DV showed, less positive affects when interacting with their partner and more negative interactions. […] In regards to dyadic dimensions, in this study negative escalation was more often observed in couples where the boyfriend or the girlfriend had reported inflicting DV, while less interactional synchrony was observed only for boy perpetrators.» (p. 57)