Trajectories of Alcohol Use and Binge Drinking among Pregnant Inuit Women

Trajectories of Alcohol Use and Binge Drinking among Pregnant Inuit Women

Trajectories of Alcohol Use and Binge Drinking among Pregnant Inuit Women

Trajectories of Alcohol Use and Binge Drinking among Pregnant Inuit Womens

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Référence bibliographique [19378]

Alcohol and Alcoholism, vol. 51, no 3, p. 339-346.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study (a) investigated trajectories of alcohol consumption and binge drinking among Inuit women beginning the year prior to pregnancy until the end of the first postpartum year, and (b) assessed transitions between time periods. Since variations in drinking patterns have been reported in many populations in relation to personal and familial factors, (c) we examined whether these influences could be identified as predictors of changes in alcohol behavior.» (p. 340)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 248 femmes vivant dans le Québec arctique qui ont été rencontrées à la mi-grossesse, et 1 et 11 mois postpartum.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our analysis of Inuit alcohol consumption is the first to present distinctive trajectories covering the year before conception to the year after pregnancy. Our results indicated that the proportions of alcohol use and binge drinking varied considerably across specific periods related to pregnancy, and that probability of transitioning from drinking to non-drinking behavior and vice versa changed considerably across these periods. Yet, most notably, 60% of women did not change status and were alcohol consumers during all four time periods, indicating that alcohol use in this specific population is not well understood. […] Our findings support the view that both alcohol use and binge drinking status are more likely to change to abstainer or non-binge drinker in the conception period. Such changes in alcohol behavior may reflect general pregnancy-related lifestyles and life habit changes, especially among women who planned the pregnancy. […] Our findings also indicate that Inuit women are more likely to change from abstainer to alcohol user after the conception period. This outcome is a particular public health concern as the long-lasting effects of fetal exposure to alcohol are well-documented.» (p. 343)