Who Should be Responsible for Supporting Individuals with Mental Health Problems? Perceptions of Multiple Stakeholders

Who Should be Responsible for Supporting Individuals with Mental Health Problems? Perceptions of Multiple Stakeholders

Who Should be Responsible for Supporting Individuals with Mental Health Problems? Perceptions of Multiple Stakeholders

Who Should be Responsible for Supporting Individuals with Mental Health Problems? Perceptions of Multiple Stakeholderss

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The goal of this master thesis is to «explore the perceptions of youth with FEP [first-episode psychosis], their families, treatment providers, and mental health policy and decision makers as to who should be responsible for supporting individuals with mental health problems and to discover what responsibilities they ascribe to these parties.» (p. 53)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Research is based on the following two questions: «Who do different stakeholders feel should be responsible for supporting individuals with mental health problems? […] What factors shape perceptions of who should be responsible for supporting individuals with mental health problems, and how do these relate to one another?» (p. 25)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur des discussions de groupe avec 13 patients et 12 membres de leur famille, et 18 professionnels de la santé mentale. Des rencontres ont aussi été réalisées avec 6 décideurs politiques. Tous les participants ont été recrutés à Montréal.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif (décideurs politiques)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


Results show that «[a]s the stakeholders closest to the individual, families (including parents, siblings, spouses or partners) were perceived by participants from all stakeholder groups (including families themselves) to play a pivotal role in supporting individuals with mental health problems. Indeed, families were described by two policymakers as the anchor of society and the social fabric supporting the individual even when all other stakeholders are gone. While many participants went into detail about how families can help support their ill relative, families themselves tended to speak about their own responsibilities in more general terms, stating the importance of being involved, being responsible for their ill loved one, being there for them and accompanying them in their illness.» (p. 69) «Families were by and large the stakeholder group perceived to have the greatest responsibility for providing emotional support, which included accepting their ill relative, illness and all; showing love and affection; spending time with the ill loved one and helping them grow as a person; and knowing when to step back and let their ill relative take responsibility. Families were also seen as responsible for providing instrumental supports such as financial assistance, housing (typically by having their ill relative live with them), and help liaising with schools and employers.» (p. 70)