Controlling Parenting and Physical Aggression During Elementary School

Controlling Parenting and Physical Aggression During Elementary School

Controlling Parenting and Physical Aggression During Elementary School

Controlling Parenting and Physical Aggression During Elementary Schools

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Référence bibliographique [1907]

Joussemet, Mireille, Vitaro, Frank, Barker, Edward Dylan, Côté, Sylvana, Nagin, Daniel S., Zoccolillo, Mark et Tremblay, Richard E. 2008. «Controlling Parenting and Physical Aggression During Elementary School ». Child Development, vol. 79, no 2, p. 411-425.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goal of the present study was to examine whether controlling parenting contributes to the problem of physical aggression. » (p. 411)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« This longitudinal study started in 1986 – 1987, when kindergarten children (N = 5 6,397) were randomly selected from all French-speaking schools in the Canadian province of Québec. [...] From the pool of children who had both teacher and parent ratings (N = 54,659), 1,000 boys and 1,000 girls were selected at random and constituted a representative sample for follow-up. This population-based sample was used in the present study (N = 5 1,993). » (p. 414)

Instruments :
- The « Reactivity Subscale » (Eisenberg et al., 2001);
- a questionnaire about « Mother and family characteristics »;
- the « Emotional Climate for Children Questionnaire (Falender & 414 Joussemet et al. Mehrabian, 1980) »;
- the « Diagnostic Interview Schedule (Robins, Helzer,Croughan,Williams,&Spitzer, 1981) ». (pp. 414-415)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Children who hit, kick, and fight with others are more than merely disruptive and display physical aggression. Although we do not necessarily worry when toddlers use their physical force against someone to express their anger or get something they want, we generally feel more anxious when we see older (and stronger) adolescents display similar fighting behaviors. The present study addresses the precursors of high childhood physical aggression. [...] Developmental trajectories of children’s physical aggression were modeled from yearly teachers’ ratings, from ages 6 to 12. Multinomial logistic regressions (N = 1,508) served to identify risk factors that distinguish children who display different levels of physical aggression throughout grade school. Results revealed that being a boy and having a reactive temperament were important child predictors. Parental separation and an early onset of motherhood were also significant risk factors. Finally, mothers’ controlling parenting increased the odds of following the highest trajectory of physical aggression, above and beyond the previous risk factors. » (p. 411)