The Importance of Partners for the Secondary Prevention of Melanoma: A Study Examining the Skin Self-Examination Self-Efficacy of Patients and their Partners

The Importance of Partners for the Secondary Prevention of Melanoma: A Study Examining the Skin Self-Examination Self-Efficacy of Patients and their Partners

The Importance of Partners for the Secondary Prevention of Melanoma: A Study Examining the Skin Self-Examination Self-Efficacy of Patients and their Partners

The Importance of Partners for the Secondary Prevention of Melanoma: A Study Examining the Skin Self-Examination Self-Efficacy of Patients and their Partnerss

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main objective of this research [by articles] is to examine the role played by intimate partners in the secondary prevention of melanoma through comprehensive monthly SSEs [skin self-examinations].» This abstract will concern articles 2 and 3, which are the ones that concern the couple. (p. 28) «The objective [of article 2] was to examine the role of interpersonal variables on melanoma survivors’ self-efficacy for completing monthly whole-body skin self-examinations [...]. Specifically, the impact of comfort with partner assistance for SSE, SSE support received from one’s partner, general partner support, relationship satisfaction, as well as partner attendance at a SSE education session, were examined.» (p. 69)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Article 2 asks the following questions: «1. Do SSE support, SSE comfort, general partner support, relationship satisfaction, and partner attendance at a SSE education session predict SSE self-efficacy in patients with melanoma? 2. Does partner attendance at a SSE education session moderate the relationship between (a) SSE self-efficacy and SSE support, or (b) SSE self-efficacy and SSE comfort? 3. Does gender moderate the relationship between SSE self-efficacy and (a) SSE support, or (b) SSE comfort in melanoma patients?» (p. 74) Article 3 aims at answering the following questions: «1. Do partner perceptions of SSE support and SSE comfort, as well as partner attendance at a SSE education session, predict melanoma survivors’ SSE self-efficacy? 2. Do partner perceptions of SSE support and SSE comfort, as well as partner attendance at a SSE education session, predict their own SSE self-efficacy? Are relationships between (a) partner-reported SSE support and partners’ SSE self-efficacy, and (b) partner-reported SSE comfort and partners’ SSE self-efficacy moderated by partner attendance at a SSE education session? Are relationships (a) and (b) moderated by the partner’s gender? 3. How concordant are patient and partner reports of SSE comfort, SSE support, and SSE self-efficacy?» (p. 105)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon du deuxième article est composé de 137 patients canadiens atteints du mélanome, alors que le troisième article est basé sur la participation de 52 patients atteints de la même maladie et accompagnés de leurs partenaires.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Results [from article 2] highlight the importance of partner involvement in SSE education, as well as the importance of patient comfort with a partner’s assistance during skin examinations. Findings inform potential modifications to the follow-up care provided to melanoma survivors by demonstrating the importance of partner involvement in SSE education. More specifically, patient comfort with partner involvement in SSE education may increase patient SSE self-efficacy, which is an important predictor of SSE behaviour.» (p. 69) Results of article 3 «show that Partner attendance at a SSE education session, as well as partner SSE support and SSE comfort, significantly predicted partners’ SSE self-efficacy. Furthermore, male patients were found to be significantly more comfortable with partner-assisted SSE, and felt more supported with SSE, than female patients. These findings highlight the role of partner comfort in assisting with SSE, partner involvement in SSE education, and underscore the importance of gender differences. Findings are discussed in terms of improving partner SSE self-efficacy to facilitate SSE practice during melanoma follow-up care.» (p. 101)