Diversity of Roles Played by Aboriginal Men in Domestic Violence in Quebec

Diversity of Roles Played by Aboriginal Men in Domestic Violence in Quebec

Diversity of Roles Played by Aboriginal Men in Domestic Violence in Quebec

Diversity of Roles Played by Aboriginal Men in Domestic Violence in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [17807]

International Journal of Men’s Health, vol. 14, no 3, p. 287-300.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present article describes one of the key subjective dimensions of men’s experience in this area: their diverse roles in domestic violence. Their roles are examined by considering the interactional nature of domestic violence in an aboriginal context.» (p. 288)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample population was composed of 39 aboriginal men resident in Quebec, aged between 26 and 58 years old (mean age = 39) and with previous experience of domestic violence, whether as victims and/or instigators.» (p. 291)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The perspective of aboriginal men with experience of domestic violence is heavily marked by a wide range of socio-cultural, structural and individual factors. Some men associate their experiences with these factors (residential school experiences, socio-economic context, forced assimilation, etc.), with perceived negative effects among aboriginal communities, within their families and in their personal life history.» (p.292) «The interviews conducted as part of this study highlighted the roles played by men in domestic violence incidents. Three specific role types were identified: men who were unable to define precisely their role, men as victims and men as instigators.» (p. 293) «The analysis showed that most of the participants described their experiences of domestic violence as stemming from interactive and conflict-based dynamics in which the roles played by men change according to the incidents described or the relationship in which the incidents occur. The collected data also show how the roles of aboriginal men in domestic violence have changed over time and vary in different relationships. If it is safe to assume that the violence experienced in aboriginal couples is context-dependent, interactive and reciprocal, it would seem necessary and urgent to change current policies and practices aimed at prevention and intervention in this area.» (p. 297)