Intimate Partner Violence: Making the Case for Joint Couple Treatment

Intimate Partner Violence: Making the Case for Joint Couple Treatment

Intimate Partner Violence: Making the Case for Joint Couple Treatment

Intimate Partner Violence: Making the Case for Joint Couple Treatments

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Référence bibliographique [17806]

Family Journal, vol. 22, no 1, p. 62-68.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In this article, we argue that a conjoint couple therapy approach to IPV [intimate partner violence] is advantageous under specific circumstances.» (p. 1)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«[C]onjoint couple therapy for IPV is becoming established as a legitimate treatment for partner violence and has been shown to be effective in stopping the violence, and increasing appropriate interpersonal communication in the couple (Heyman & Neidig, 1997). The collective insights from the literature on conjoint treatment are worth summarizing as they can provide practitioners from various camps with a start point for decision making (e.g., refer or continue with supervision). Therefore, conjoint treatment should be considered when (a) there is no substance abuse or mental health issues that may compromise safety; (b) the couple experiences common couple violence of mild to moderate severity; (c) the violence is a result of poor problem solving (i.e., is situational) and is not motivated by need for control; and (d) the violent individual takes responsibility and does not blame the partner for the violence.» (p. 6)