Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?

Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?

Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?

Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?s

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Référence bibliographique [17689]

Currie, Janet, Stabile, Mark et Jones, Lauren. 2014. «Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD? ». Journal of Health Economics, vol. 37, p. 58-69.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper examines the effect of a “natural experiment” in Quebec that greatly expanded access to stimulant medication, and the take up of stimulants among children with ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].» (p. 68)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We use data from the NLSCY [National Longitudinal Survey of Canadian Youth], a national longitudinal data set which began with an initial sample of children ages 0–11 and their families in 1994. In the second wave of data collection in 1996, 15 871 of these children were surveyed [...]. We use the children born in 1985 or later who appear in both the 1994 and 1996 surveys as the base sample of this study» (p. 60)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the results, «[o]ne might have anticipated that increases in access to medication would be associated with improved outcomes among these children. Instead, we actually find some evidence of negative effects. Some of these negative effects are consistent with known possible side effects of stimulant medication, especially depression. We find little evidence of positive effects on academic outcomes or schooling attainment. In fact, we find deterioration in important academic outcomes including grade repetition and math scores.» (p. 68) This study considers the effect of the medication on the relation between the kids and their parent. «We find that the introduction of the prescription drug insurance program increased the use of stimulants in Quebec relative to the rest of Canada. However, we find no evidence that the performance of children with ADHD improved. In fact, the increase in medication use among children with ADHD is associated with increases in the probability of grade repetition, lower math scores, and a deterioration in relationships with parents. When we turn to an examination of long-term outcomes, we find that increases in medication use are associated with increases in the probability that a child has ever suffered from depression and decreases in the probability of post-secondary education among girls.» (p. 59)