Rates and Risk Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and with Postpartum Onset

Rates and Risk Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and with Postpartum Onset

Rates and Risk Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and with Postpartum Onset

Rates and Risk Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and with Postpartum Onsets

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Référence bibliographique [17498]

Verreault, Nancy, Da Costa, Deborah, Marchand, André, Ireland, Kierla, Dritsa, Maria et Khalife, Samir. 2014. «Rates and Risk Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms during Pregnancy and with Postpartum Onset ». Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 35, no 3, p. 84-91.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of elevated depressive symptoms in the third trimester of pregnancy and at 3 months postpartum.» (p. 85)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Pregnant women between 25 and 40 weeks of pregnancy were recruited at the offices of obstetrician/gynecologists affiliated with the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) or at the ultrasound department at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) in Montreal, Canada.» (p. 85)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In the present study, the rate of depressed mood was higher during pregnancy compared to the postpartum screening. The rate of depressed mood was 28.3% during the third trimester of pregnancy and 16.4% at 3 months postpartum. Among women with postpartum depressed mood, 6.6% were new postpartum cases. […] The rate of new onset postpartum depressive symptoms in our study is similar to a recent study conducted in USA [United states of America] which reported a rate of new onset postpartum depression of 6% in women at 4–12 weeks following childbirth. While more than half of women reporting elevated depressive symptoms postpartum exhibit elevated symptoms during pregnancy, for a subgroup of women, symptoms only intensify postpartum which underscores the importance of systematically screening both during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. In terms of the course of depressive symptoms, we observed significant reductions in the intensity of depressive symptoms from pregnancy to postpartum in women who completed the postnatal follow-up. This decrease in depressive symptoms from pregnancy to postpartum has also been found in other studies. However, it is difficult to generalize this finding to single women or those of ethnic minority groups, as they were proportionally underrepresented among those who responded in the postnatal period.» (p. 88)